Monday, September 8, 2008

a question ...

i was making ice cream bases today. i use the same recipe for vanilla and burnt caramel. the only thing i do different is caramelize the sugar until its almost burnt. it tastes amazing, trust me! oh, its also salted.

as is my habit (and every chef in the world) i taste my food as it progresses. when all the bases where finished and cooled, i stirred and gave them one last taste. i noticed something different.

the vanilla ice cream was sweet. the caramel ice cream tasted like caramel, but it was no where near as sweet as the vanilla. how could this be (aside from the salt)? its the same recipe. its the same amount of sugar ...

does sugar loose its 'sweetness' as it caramelizes? why? what happens?

2 comments:

rr said...

ah guy?
sugars are carbohydrates and water soluble. a slight difference makes a big difference in the biochemical properties & physical properties such as melting point & crystalization. your loosing hyrdogen & oxygen molecules when you heat the corbohydrate and thus allowing less sweet flavor to be passed on. you now have a different molecule structure.

jb said...

look at the big brain on brett....